Vermouth

Bulleit Rye Cocktails

These are the four cocktails served at the Bulleit Rye launch party in San Francisco. There were multiple bars running until last call. They brought out a mix of classic and contemporary cocktails for us.

Manhattan

  • 2 oz Bulleit Rye
  • 1 oz Carpano Antica
  • 3 dashes Angostura bitters

Prepared traditionally by stirring in ice untill thouroughly chilled. strained, and served in a martini glass with either lemon zest or a cherry. That night we had brandied cherries, but a maraschino will work.

Presbyterian

  • 2 oz Bulleit Rye
  • 1/2 oz fresh lime juice
  • 3/4 oz ginger syrup
  • Soda¬†

Stir rye, lime juice and ginger syrup together over ice in a highball glass and top with the soda. Garnish with a lime wedge and candied ginger. 

Manna-Hata

A new twist on the Manhattan

Rob Roy Revisited

Ah blessed science.

To develop and select the Whiskey Bros. approved Rob Roy we need research. We pulled up the eight blended whiskys that we happen to have on hand: Buchannan 12, Chivas Regal 12 Chivas Regal 18, Famous Grouse, Johnnie Walker Black, Johnnie Walker Green, Johnnie Walker Red, And Suntory Hibiki for evaluation. We promptly put the Hibiki back away where it belongs, before my wife beat me.

The Rob Roy was First served at the Dorchester Hotel London, 1909 and Johnnie Walker was the Scotch of choice. Hence our inclusion of the three most common varieties of Johnnie Walker in this test.

We've decided to persue the "Perfect" Rob Roy, also known as Beal's Cocktail which is made with equal parts dry and sweet vermouth, a couple of dashes of bitters and Blended Scotch Whisky.

Posted in Submitted by Mark on Sat, 02/23/2008 - 16:35.

Rob Roy

The Rob Roy is basically a Manhattan made with Scotch whiskey. It is named for Robert Roy MacGregor.

I don't have my own recipe yet, but I will get one together after some experimentation. I think that finding the right ingredients for me will take some thought. Many of the Scotch whiskeys that I would choose are "done". The idea of using Vermouth and bitters to "enhance" a scotch seems like using neon spray paint to enhance the David. Maybe that's just the single-malts talking again.

I think I will try Scotch that is generally available, one that could take the new flavors as an addition instead of grafitti. Johnny Walker Red or Black are used commonly but I try to be different, so maybe Glenfiddich. Using Johnny Walker Green seems like a case of subtraction by addition, but anything is possible. I won't know until I try. A lowland single malt Scotch would be from the same neighborhood as Rob Roy himself, though bitters and Vermouth aren't exactly local.

The IBA describes it this way:

Posted in Submitted by Mark on Tue, 02/19/2008 - 07:30.

The Manhattan

Even though the Martini gets all the press these days, the Manhattan is an older drink with stronger provenance. Where the modern Martini bears little resemblance to its early incarnations, the Manhattan has retained much of the original character. Both can easily find their roots in the 1800's but were developed on opposite coasts.

My first Manhattan was made with Crown Royal as I will describe below. This seemed like a perfectly reasonable choice for a Manhattan, but for some reason the last couple bar tenders have not agreed.The last time I ordered a Manhattan, their preference was for Maker's Mark. The traditional whiskey was rye, but like so many modern interpretations of old drinks, bourbon has become the whiskey of choice.

I serve my Crown Royal Manhattans in a martini glass, stirred and straight up. Here's my recipe:

Posted in Submitted by Mark on Tue, 02/19/2008 - 05:47.
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